Climate Change Facts

Climate change is something we often hear a lot about but knowing what global warming and the changing climate really means for our planet can be confusing.

Climate change refers to the process of the earth getting warmer and the climate as we know it changing rapidly over time.

The globe has become roughly 1°C warmer since the industrial revolution. While the numbers sound small; it is having a significant impact on the world around us. With global warming and climate change continues to break new records year after year and showing no signs of slowing, it is essential to understand the facts behind these changes.

Over 1 Million Species Face Extinction
The changes in our climate have increased the number of species going extinct every year by a considerable amount. Usually, there would be between one and five species going extinct every year, and now it is estimated that we are experiencing multiple extinctions daily. Climate change has resulted in us losing species at 1,000 to 10,000 times the normal rate of extinction.

Ice Sheets Are Shrinking
Ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica have decreased dramatically in recent years, according to data from NASA’s Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment show. Between 1993 and 2016, Greenland lost an average of 286 billion tons of ice annually, while Antarctica lost 127 billion tons of ice.

Irreversible Impact By 2030
A report by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has said that urgent action is required to avoid the awful effects of global warming and climate change on the world. If things don’t change, then the coral reefs could be gone completely, widespread flooding, extreme heat and droughts could plague the earth.

The US Is The Second Largest CO2 Contributor
Although the United States is home to just 4.4 percent of the entire world’s population, it is the second largest contributor to CO2 in the atmosphere. If the entire world lived in the same way as those in the US, then we would need four of our planet to make enough resources to sustain everyone.

People often confuse climate and weather - the two really are quite different.